Tattoos may not be the best idea in the residence halls

Tattoos may not be the best idea in the residence halls

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By Monica Bradburn | Staff Photographer
Sophomore Hailey O’Brien gets a tattoo on her ribs by tattoo artist Jessie Villasenor on Wednesday at Evolved Artforms Tattoo. Tattoos are a regular fashion trend. Nearly every student seems to have a little ink. 

What many students don’t know is that these permanent pieces of art may be risky when living in a residence hall.

Most freshmen coming to campus are just turning 18, the age to finally obtain a legal tattoo. Not every student will take advantage of this, but having three tattoo parlors near campus just adds to the temptation. People with new tattoos tend to get excited and may not think about all the work that goes into the after-care, this is how infection can occur.

“I just got my second tattoo a few weeks ago and it was harder to take care of than the first,” said Shelby Township freshman Natalie Wojcickij. “It was really hard to find Dial soap and Aquaphor around campus. With the tattoo being on my thigh it was hard to air it out. I was kind of ill-prepared.”

In residence halls, showers can be small and this can be a problem when trying to clean a new tattoo without fully submersing it in water. A tattoo needs a lot of extra attention, from delicately washing it to making sure it doesn’t dry out from heat.

Living in a dorm also can be messy. If the room or bathroom is not regularly cleaned, bacteria may grow. That’s no place for a fresh tattoo. Since residence halls are highly populated and temperatures can get warm, bacteria can grow at a faster rate.

According to a PR Newswire study done on residence hall rooms, people in these small areas are more at risk to staph infection because residence halls are highly populated with busy students who may not have time to clean everyday.

Staph is a bacteria that is regularly on a person’s skin. Each person is a carrier of a different type of […]

Tattoos may not be the best idea in the residence halls